artoftheautomobile:

McLaren P1

artoftheautomobile:

McLaren P1

thelovelyseas:

These jellyfish (Mastigias sp.) inhabit a saltwater lake, and are effectively cut off from the sea. They have lost the ability to sting, and obtain all or most of their nutrition from symbiotic algae living within their tissues. (Palau, Micronesia) by David Hall

loveknowsnodistancee:

∞Relationship Blog!∞

My wish is to travel through this life, experiencing adventures, and making beautiful memories. One day at the end you’re the last person I want to see before I go. That is how much I love you.

loveknowsnodistancee:

∞Relationship Blog!∞

My wish is to travel through this life, experiencing adventures, and making beautiful memories. One day at the end you’re the last person I want to see before I go. That is how much I love you.

thelovelyseas:

Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, Bahamas by David Hall

thelovelyseas:

Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, Bahamas by David Hall

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.
The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.
In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.

In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

brutalgeneration:

The Milkyway and a faint aurora over Sørtinden in Tromvik (by John A.Hemmingsen)

brutalgeneration:

The Milkyway and a faint aurora over Sørtinden in Tromvik (by John A.Hemmingsen)

nevver:

Face in the crowd, John Hallmén

Please

Please

kqedscience:

New Fossil Takes A Bite Out Of Theory That Sharks Barely Evolved
“Sharks have looked more or less the same for hundreds of millions of years. But a newly discovered fossil suggests that under the hood, a modern shark is very different from its ancient ancestors.
The finding, published in the journal Nature, strongly implies that sharks are not the “living fossils” many paleontologists once thought they were. “They have evolved through time to improve upon the basic model,” says John Maisey, a paleontologist at the American Museum of Natural History who helped identify the fossil.”
Learn more from npr: http://goo.gl/yKYFCv

kqedscience:

New Fossil Takes A Bite Out Of Theory That Sharks Barely Evolved

Sharks have looked more or less the same for hundreds of millions of years. But a newly discovered fossil suggests that under the hood, a modern shark is very different from its ancient ancestors.

The finding, published in the journal Nature, strongly implies that sharks are not the “living fossils” many paleontologists once thought they were. “They have evolved through time to improve upon the basic model,” says John Maisey, a paleontologist at the American Museum of Natural History who helped identify the fossil.”

Learn more from nprhttp://goo.gl/yKYFCv